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NCERT Solutions for Class 10 English Main Course Book (MCB) Chapter 12



Unit-3 : Solutions of Questions on Page Number : 108


Q1 :

Name

Age

Year of becoming an astronaut

No. of space Journeys

Experience with zero gravity

Ways of staying fit

Memorable moments

What one has learnt from the travels

Peggy hitson              

Answer:

Name

Age

Year of becoming an astronaut

No. of space Journeys

Experience with zero gravity

Ways of staying fit

Memorable moments

What one has learnt from travels

Peggy Whitson 48 1996 Two six-month tours on the International Space Station,
in 2002 and 2007-2008
A walking laboratory for the long-term effects of zero
gravity, Peggy explained how
one’s
ability to think in 3D and intuit how to move objects in
a different way than on earth is highly important. She
said “The
second time I went to the station, it felt like coming
home. I adapted and got comfortable much
quicker.“ “It’s a
nice plus that without the effects of gravity, everything
is lifted while you’re up there, so you look younger”
added Peggy. She gamed twice, being confined in space
without gravity for six months, both the times. The
second time as the first woman commander, she racked up
377 days in space on her two missions, more than any
other U.S. astronaut.
“Fitness is a
lot more important than strength. With no gravity for
resistance, muscles and bones deteriorate quickly up
there, so every day we do an hour of cardio on a
specially designed cycle or treadmill and an hour of
resistance training. You need strength for space walks,
as every motion works against the pressure of the space
suits we wear, and it’s very fatiguing. Exercising always
made me feel more positive and upbeat afterward
too.“ said Peggy
Whitson.
Mesmerised by the view of
earth’s
curvature on their orbit every 90 minutes she went on
describing how one could see the layers of atmosphere,
extended beyond the surface, met the blackness of space
far across.
When Peggy returned her agility and quick motions, like
dribbling basketball, were severely hindered. But with
the help of a physical assessment for a month she was
back to her pre-flight norm. She explained
“exploration
is a very important part of who we are, and if we want to
literally expand our horizons, we have to keep doing it.
Construction of the International Space Station shows we
can expand those horizons culturally as
well.“

Q2 :

Name

Age

Year of becoming an astronaut

No. of space Journeys

Experience with zero gravity

Ways of staying fit

Memorable moments

What one has learnt from the travels

Pamela Melroy

             

Answer:

Name

Age

Year of becoming an astronaut

No. of space Journeys

Experience with zero gravity

Ways of staying fit

Memorable moments

What one has learnt from travels

47 1995 Three shuttle missions, in 2000, 2002, and 2007 The retired Air Force test pilot Pamela recalled the
physical sensation of zero gravity, the magic, and how
occasionally she dreams about it.
“It happens a
lot within the first week or two of landing, and it can
be profoundly disorienting, especially when you wake up
and you’re not sure where you are, in gravity or not. It
is fun to go back and visit,
though“ she went on
describing.
During deployment of a solar wing at the station a guide
wire snapped tearing the wing and keeping it from
providing full power. Melroy remembered how all were
gathered to go over the final list of issues.
“The whole
crew was giving their input, and everyone was firing on
all cylinders. I realized I didn’t need to say anything.
I kind of floated away and observed them. They were doing
what they were supposed to do, pulling together, without
needing to be guided in any way. That was the best moment
for me.”
Pamela Melroy

Q3 :

Name

Age

Year of becoming an astronaut

No. of space Journeys

Experience with zero gravity

Ways of staying fit

Memorable moments

What one has learnt from the travels

Sunita Williams

             

Answer:

Name

Age

Year of becoming an astronaut

No. of space Journeys

Experience with zero gravity

Ways of staying fit

Memorable moments

What one has learnt from travels

Sunita Williams 43 1998 Six months on the space station in 2006-2007, including
more than 29 hours of space walks
“I learned
after about a week how to fly gracefully without going
too fast or jerking around. I had a hard time remembering
how to walk. I prefer flying!” shared Sunita. She also
said that long hair could be troublesome in space. It
sticks to everything and so she decided to cut it as she
was preparing to dock.
Williams, a naval aviator and test pilot with her 195
days in space explained how
“the treadmill
harness is a little uncomfortable and takes some getting
used to. I really like running outside and having the
wind blow on you, even if
it’s hot
and humid like in Houston. But I got into a routine. If
you’re healthy, your body can adapt to
anything.“
Sunita Williams broke Shannon
Lucid’s
previous endurance record-until Peggy Whitson broke both
the women’s records in 2008. She also
“ran“
the Boston Marathon from the station treadmill, with an
unofficial time of 4 hours and 24 minutes (during which
the International Space Station orbited the earth about
three times). On viewing home from up there she remarked
“when you have
that perspective of being far away and looking back at
the planet, you don’t see the hustle and bustle or the
borders. You see a very peaceful place. Gandhi tried to
instill the feeling of oneness in all of us. Seeing our
planet from space, you understand
that.“
Sunita shared how unusual it is to stay in space for six
months on the first flight and how it feels on being
locked in a can with couple of guys. But she embraced the
idea. “I
prepared for almost eight years! All the training was
definitely beneficial for living up there. And with my
Navy background, I’d gone on deployments before, so I
wasn’t
worried about leaving home for six months. The cosmonauts
were very professional, and we all had mutual respect and
understanding.“

Q4 :

Name

Age

Year of becoming an astronaut

No. of space Journeys

Experience with zero gravity

Ways of staying fit

Memorable moments

What one has learnt from the travels

Barbara Morgan

             

Answer:

Name

Age

Year of becoming an astronaut

No. of space Journeys

Experience with zero gravity

Ways of staying fit

Memorable moments

What one has learnt from travels

Barbara Morgan 56 1985 One shuttle mission in 2007 After waiting for a long time of 21 years for her shuttle
mission, Barbara Morgan shared her experiences:
“No matter how
I was situated the first day, my body felt like it was
upside down. That might’ve been because all your fluids
shift up to your head. And what memory do we have of
being in that situation? It’s like when
we’re
kids, hanging upside
down.“ She recalled
how well she had slept the first night,
“I was amazed
on orbit because the minute I strapped myself in, I fell
asleep right away.“
On health concerns she said, “I found that for the first
couple of days, I was staying hydrated and I wasn’t very
hungry. My gastrointestinal system seems to rely on
gravity to a certain extent, and it sort of shut down.
But the body adjusts“
with time.
Although a worrisome puncture in the heat shield diverted
some of the crew’s attention for a while, she remembered
moments she cherishes:
“Food gave us
teachable moments to show Newton’s laws and properties of
liquids. It was fun. My favourite thing to eat was beef
Stroganoff. The Russians shared some of their beef and
lamb dishes, caviar, and cheeses, and that was very
nice.“
The toilet in the shuttle looks similar to what we have
on earth said Morgan. She went on explaining
“but there are
bars you put over your thighs to hold yourself down, and
it uses fans that pull body waste away. There’s a hose
with a personal funnel attachment for male or female
anatomy. The trick is to keep it tightly sealed so that
things don’t get away and float around. When we get asked
‘How do you go
to the
bathroom?’
the answer is
‘Very
carefully.’“

Q5 : Peggy Whitson has been described as a ‘walking laboratory’ because ________________
Answer :
She racked up 377 days in space on her two missions, more than any other U.S. astronaut. Her space walks totalled nearly 40 hours, more than any other woman astronaut.


Q6 : Peggy feels that returning to earth is not a pleasant experience as ________________
Answer :
Her agility and quick motions, like playing basketball and the timing to dribble and do a layup, were severely hindered. But she had her physical fitness assessment about a month after her return, and she was back to pre-flight norm.


Q7 : Pam Melroy and her crew members were applauded when ________________
Answer :
During deployment of a solar wing a guide wire snapped, tearing the wing and keeping it from providing full power. The fellow astronaut Scott Parazynski, MD, rode a boom for an hour and a half to reach the damaged area. He then performed a kind of delicate surgery for seven hours to cut the snagged wire and fix the torn parts. Finally it worked.


Q8 : The historic moment during Pam Melroy’s space flight was ________________
Answer :
That two women were commanding two spacecrafts at the same time. She remarked that so wouldn’t have been possible 25 years ago. But Peggy and she just try to have fun with it. And she said, “The most important part for us is that we’re good friends and we really enjoyed working together.”


Q9 : According to Melroy the space station is important because ________________
Answer :
According to Melroy the space station is important because the long-term payoff is the science of understanding how the human body operates in space and other developments that we may not understand or value till later.


Q10 : According to Melroy the space station is important because ________________
Answer :
According to Melroy the space station is important because the long-term payoff is the science of understanding how the human body operates in space and other developments that we may not understand or value till later.


Q11 : Sunita Williams donated her hair because________________
Answer :
First of all, long hair can be troublesome in space; they stick to everything. Besides, one wouldn’t want them to be floating around the space station. Also she had some friends who had had cancer and had to go through chemo. She said, “I know how traumatic that is, so I thought the least I could do was donate my hair.”


Q12 : Sunita Williams broke the record of ________________
Answer :
Shannon Lucid’s endurance until Peggy Whitson broke both the women’s records in 2008.


Q13 : Barbara had to wait for her turn to go into space because________________
Answer :
Originally she was chosen as a backup for the NASA Teacher in Space Program in the 1980s. However, after her training with Christa McAuliffe and the tragic Challenger accident in 1986, Morgan returned to teaching elementary school in Idaho but remained hopeful that, as NASA’s Teacher in Space Designee, she’d get to fulfill McAuliffe’s mission someday. Finally, in August of 2007, she blasted off in the shuttle Endeavour for a 13-day mission, even operating the space station’s robotic arms during space walks.


Q14 : Barbara had to wait for her turn to go into space because________________
Answer :
Originally she was chosen as a backup for the NASA Teacher in Space Program in the 1980s. However, after her training with Christa McAuliffe and the tragic Challenger accident in 1986, Morgan returned to teaching elementary school in Idaho but remained hopeful that, as NASA’s Teacher in Space Designee, she’d get to fulfill McAuliffe’s mission someday. Finally, in August of 2007, she blasted off in the shuttle Endeavour for a 13-day mission, even operating the space station’s robotic arms during space walks.